California’s Eastern Sierra: Mountains. Lakes. Ghost Towns. (Part 1)

June Lake, California

Hi friends! It’s been a while. Way too long, actually. Life has been super busy. But, I’m glad to be back and I hope to hear from you all.

Last week, my family and I went on a road trip to the Eastern Sierra – a remote, stunningly beautiful area of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Mammoth Lakes, California

The area is filled with alpine lakes, snow capped mountains, tiny little villages, and a ghost town named Bodie. In its heyday from 1877-1882, Bodie had 10,000 residents, 60 saloons, and produced more than $35 million in gold and silver. Now, it’s just a dusty, extremely remote abandoned town in a state of arrested decay. It was a very cool place to visit.

Bodie Ghost Town, California

The last resident left Bodie in 1942, but by that time, the town was long past its glory days of the late 1800s. Around 50 buildings still exist on the settlement, which represents only 5 percent of the amount Bodie had at its peak.

Bodie Ghost Town, California
Bodie Ghost Town, California

Another cool stop was Mono Lake, which is comprised of massive amounts of salt. In fact, its one of the saltiest lakes on earth. Because of the salt content, not much life can survive in the lake other than a few organisms, including tiny little creatures called brine shrimp.

Mono Lake, California

Those interesting rock formations pictured above and below are called tufa (limestone that forms below the lake through a chemical reaction between fresh spring water and salt water.) Some of the tufa are huge towers, but we couldn’t get close enough to those to grab a good shot.

Mono Lake, California

It was awesome to get away for a few days in a slow-paced area imbedded in unspoiled nature. Hope you enjoy the photos! 🙂

Mammoth Lakes, California

53 replies »

  1. Thanks Kevin….it is winter here in Oz, so it was great to see these beautiful pictures…thank you for sharing your adventure…it was a privilege…hugs, Barbara from Sydney xoxoxo

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It is great seeing you back again, Kevin. At times we all need a pause for varying reasons so to see a friend again is precious.
    I do so love your photos , they brim with history and beauty as do your words.

    You and your family experience a lot of wonder together, bless. 😊 .

    Miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Kevin, good to see a post from you. What lovely images. I take it that Bodie was a part of the California gold rush it’s kind of a shame to see a part of history decay away. Such an interesting post, look forward to part 2. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Laura, apparently the original gold rush occurred on the western side of the Sierras, and then after the mines were fully tapped, the miners headed to the Eastern Sierras. So, yep, it was part of the gold rush. Bodie is now a state park so they’ve fixed foundations, roofs, etc. but never refurbished – only repairs. Thanks for the kind words! Terrific to hear from you. 😃😃

      Liked by 1 person

  4. A great place for sure! the preservation has frozen it in time, I recall when kid I read about natural parks in the U.S. and the aspect is the same, which gives me quite a sense of tranquility in a time that things seem rather to banish. Thank you, Kevin.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. When I left San Diego, the fall of 2018, headed to Spokane Valley, WA, I took 95. I stopped in Independence, CA the first night and loved it. I was on a fast track trip so only took 3 days to get to WA. When I manage to leave the Pacific NW and finish my present work, I’m thinking of heading back down to SD for a vacation. This time, I’d like to take the time to check out Hells Kitchen area, Yosemite, Mammoth Lakes, Sequoia National Park and other areas near Independence. Thanks for this post.

    Hope you and your family are doing well

    Warmly, katelon

    Liked by 1 person

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